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Prague Travel Tips

4.0 stars

Insider advice for your Prague vacation


lejla06
Probabely the best located hostel in Prague! 5 stars
Prague Square Hostel was located at the Old Town Square, just around the corner. Very busy street, so might be noisy at night, but you really do not need to use public transport at all. Hostel was clean, staff informative and welcoming. Highly recommended.

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Lucas6
Hostel Boathouse 3 stars
For those who don’t mind trams, there are certain advantages to staying outside the centre of Prague. Situated in the quiet leafy suburb of Branik, Hostel Boathouse might be a good fifteen minutes from the Old Town, but it’s also only metres from a secluded bank of the Vltava river. Surrounded by parks and woodland, the boathouse feels more like a summer camp than a hostel, and while the ladies in charge might appear to keep an eye on you, they’ll also keep the beer fridge open until midnight and let you crawl in the front door at anytime time you like. Highly recommended in the warmer months and also in the off-season if you fancy a cheap dorm room to yourself.

Lodnicka 1, Praha 4, Branik


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Lucas6
Kozicka 4 stars
This cosy cellar bar may not appear to be all that unique for Prague, yet Kozica (or little goat) is one of the few places in the heart of the Old Town that attracts about as many Czechs as it does foreigners, which is some feat when you consider that most locals prefer to stay out of the centre of the city. It might have something to do with the cheap Czech food on offer, the selection of wines, or perhaps it's the down to earth atmosphere that you won't find in too many of the bars nearby. Open from noon - 4am weekdays and from 6pm - 4 am Sat & Sun, Kozicka is safe bet for lunch, dinner or even a big night out.

Address : Kozi 1, Praha 1


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Lucas6
U Prince Hotel Terrace Bar 4 stars
Despite it’s lovely eclectic mixture of Romanesque, Gothic and Baroque styles, it isn’t the architecture that attracts most visitors to the U Prince Hotel. From the roof top terrace you can find one of the most spectacular views of the Old Town Square, and it’s open to the public. Rarely is it possible to get so close to the magical Prague skyline and to appreciate the inspiring twin towers of Tyn church without risking a sore neck, while the Astronomical Clock is so close that you could almost hand your cocktail umbrella to one of the animated figures when the big hand strikes twelve. Open from 11.00 - 24.00 and undercover in the colder months, the U Prince Terrace Bar is certainly worthy of a tipple come rain or shine.

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SavvyLeo
Avoid Cold Breakfast in Mala Strana 2 stars
After a tiring night (and morning) of standing in a crowd of 20,000 people to hear U.S. President Obama speak, I thought I would go to a café with my friends to relax and eat a much-needed breakfast. Our legs were tired and our stomachs were empty, so we decided to try Amica Café in Mala Strana across the street from J.J. Murphy’s Irish Pub. Although it looked like a tourist destination, we decided to go in, mostly because it could accomodate a large group of seven. We sat down in comfortable seating and the server took our order. What seemed like an hour later, our food came. I ordered the Italian omelette that came with fried potatoes and toast. I took one bite and realized my hunger would not be satisfied. The omelette was cold, the potatoes were far from fried and cold, and there was no toast. For 119kc, I would have rather gone to McDonald’s. I spoke to the server and asked her if omelettes were supposed to be cold. She said no of course, but refused to do anything about it. She finally brought the “toast” to the table. Apparently, toast in the establishment meant soft bread with melted butter on top. The whole experience was disappointing and the food was sub-par.

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Lucas6
Riegrovy Sady Beer Garden 5 stars
Often overlooked by short term visitors struggling to find their way out of the winding cobbled streets of the Old Town, Prague’s beer gardens are what makes this city such a delight in the warmer months. Thanks largely to the docile nature of most Czechs, it’s possible to take a large area of beautiful parkland like they did in Riegrovy Sady, fill it will enough tables to accommodate a small army of drinkers, and then serve them as much of the world’s best beer as they please. It’s hard to imagine such a place working elsewhere, but here the only trouble you’re likely to experience is getting a seat close enough to the big screens when there’s football or ice hockey on. Not that you’ll care once you’re sipping on a smooth Gambrinus with the glorious Central European sun creeping through the lush foliage overhead. Lovely.

Address: Vinohrady Praha 2 Tram: 11 (stop: Vinohradský Pavilon, Italská)


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Lucas6
Žluté lázně - Prague Beach 5 stars
Situated in the very heart of Europe, Prague is one of the last places you’d expect to find a sandy beach. But that’s exactly what they built on the banks of the Vltava river in Podoli not so far from the centre of town. Open from April to October, Zlute Lazne (Golden Spa in English) is a unique outdoor sport and leisure complex. Besides the contrived sand, huts and cocktails bars, the three and a half hectare site also has beach volley ball courts, petanque pitches, table tennis, giant chess, restaurants, barbeques, beer gardens and even a nightclub. It all sounds a little too good to be true, and late on a sunny afternoon with a cold Pilsner in hand it might just feel that way. However the family atmosphere usually keeps most patrons from over indulging, while the murky Vltava water generally prevents most people from swimming.

Podolske Nabrezi 5, Prague 4


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Lucas6
U Sudu Wine Bar 5 stars
If you randomly stumbled across U Sudu there’s a good chance you wouldn’t stick around long enough to order a drink, such is the dull atmosphere at the upstairs bar. However those in the know will tell you to venture out the back to where you’d normally expect the toilet to be, and take the rather uninviting narrow staircase down into one of Prague’s best kept secrets. Deep underground is a labyrinth of good times for both expats and locals, most tourists never find the place. A maze of dimly lit tunnels connects different rooms to suit most moods any night of the week. Sample the wine, chill to the beats and smoke them if you’ve got them, if you know what I mean.

Address: Vodickova 10, Praha 1


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SavvyLeo
The 80's Strike Back...in Prague? 4 stars
After a day of viewing the castle, and touring the Franz Kafka museum, you may want to end your night back in the 80's. The Lucerna Music Club near Wenceslas Square is a popular dance club that plays the best of the 80's and 90's every weekend. Everyone, including locals, sings along to Madonna's "Like a Prayer," and dances on the stage until 3am. Unfortunately, the club plays the same songs every weekend making it rather predictable. I have been there numerous times, but suggest that one time in the 80's is enough. If you only have a few days in Prague, I would recommend this club to go to at least once in your life.

Price of Admission: 100kc


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SavvyLeo
Best Cafe for Cake and People Watching 4 stars
Of all the cafes in Prague, I often find myself returning to Cafe Cafe. This cafe has a cool, yet casual ambiance with rather charming servers and not to mention good looking. Although it is in a touristic section of town, this trendy cafe is always filled with locals as well as tourists. They have excellent cakes (my favorite is the strawberry chocolate), great house music, and a good vibe.

The cafe is located near the Mustek Metro. For the exact location, visit www.cafecafe.cz


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ogiovetti
Irish Music Festival, Prague 5 stars
A perfect blend of Czech and Irish musicians...where have we heard that before? Right...Sunday night when Markéta Irglová and Glen Hansard earned their Oscars performing "Falling Slowly" from Once. And since that song hasn't gotten any downtime on our iPods, we were thrilled to hear of the Irish Music Festival (sponsored by Caffrey's) running in Prague from March 14th to the 23rd.

With three concerts on the 14th, one on both the 15th and 16th, five concerts on St. Patrick's Day and at least two concerts every day thereafter, there will be plenty of opportunities to get your fix of Irish craic at Czech prices. And since most of the concerts will be in bars or outdoors (click here for the full lineup), you'll just have to worry about paying for your brew (and while Guinness is traditional, czech out the Pilsners). There's a delightful mix of Irish groups: Station 65, Dave Morrissey, Jodavino, and their Czech counterparts: Poitin, Coisceim, Jauvajs. And if you can get out to Plzen--home to the original pils brew--for the evening of March 19th, you can enjoy an Irish Music Evening complete with Irish food, professionally made Irish coffee, and a tasting of famous Irish whiskeys.

Those Irish and Czech sure know how to party...and make a really great film.


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ogiovetti
Smetana's Prague 5 stars
Bedrich Smetana is everywhere in Prague. We most recently flew to the
City of a Thousand Spires from London, and as our tiny Czech Airlines
airbus touched down, they began to play on the airplane's sound system
Smetana's "Tales From the Bohemian Woods." Along with Mozart and
Dvorak, the city claims Smetana as a national asset, one who
beautifully captured his fatherland in the aptly titled symphonic
poem, "Ma Vlast." Along the Vltava river, which Bedrich Smetana
immortalized in one movement of "Má vlast," now sits a museum that's
worth interrupting your riverside stroll. Go a little past the Charles
Bridge and cut into the small side street of Novotneho lavka to visit
the Bedrich Smetana Museum.


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ogiovetti
Staromestske Namesti 5 stars
You'll come across Staromestske Namesti pretty quickly in your travels
through Prague for a variety of reasons, which you may want to read up
on over a beer at one of the perimeter cafes. Full of museums and
attractions, this old town square is also full of history—including
the Hussites (who lost their heads here in the 1400s), Protestants
(who saw the same fate in the 1600s) and Nazis (who were responsible
for quite a bit of destruction here). But don't let that spoil your
fun. It's become a bit sunnier in the past twenty or so years


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ogiovetti
Church of the Sacred Heart 5 stars
Another great stop in Zizkov (right near the metro stop, making it an
easy stop on your way into town) is the Church of the Sacred Heart.
Josip Plecnik constructed this church in the late 1920s to
extraordinary effect. You can literally ride a bicycle to the rose
window; that is if you're not completely blown away by the Art Deco
architecture in the middle of ancient spires (admission here is free).


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Sinbad the sailor
Prague's most brilliant habitants 5 stars
1 of 1 people found this review helpful
The soul of a city is also defined by its most brilliant habitants. Prague is certainly appealing to the eye with all its beautiful architecture – but has a remarkable list of notorious individuals who lived there in different periods of history. Probably everyone knows Kafka and his literature, or Alphonse Mucha and his Art Nouveau. Less known may be Jan Neruda, from whom Pablo Neruda got his “feather” name, given the received influence from the Czech writer. Jan Neruda lived in a house near the Castle of Prague – if you look carefully when going up there from downtown, you will find it.
Johannes Kepler had his house in one of the streets very close to the Bridge Charles IV. Kepler discovered the planetary laws of movement – and a plate with his name may be found under some casual veranda with flower pots…


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Vihren
Important tip - exchanging money 4 stars
A very important tip: Do not exchange money in the exchange offices covering the whole city center of Prague. The rates are awful, and I mean really awful and even if you just want to exchange 5 euros you will feel that. And even if the rate dosen’t seem that awful – there is always a catch – either the “No Commission” sign applies only for some special cases, or there is a small sign telling you that the good rates apply only if you exchange more than 10 000 euros/dollars and the rates are different for smaller sums. If you go anywhere else in the Czech Republic first – do all your financial transactions there. And if you are visiting only Prague – go only to the banks, visit no exchange offices whatsoever if you don’t want to lose your money for nothing.

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Vihren
Prague - the best capital in Europe! 5 stars
In my view Prague is the greatest capital in Europe. The city has so many attractions, but that is not the thing that make it the best – it is the whole atmosphere: the town seems like it is coming from the 14-th century with all the old houses, the small streets and the gothic towers all around. And the river that is flowing in the middle, and the difference between the old town and the castle, and this wonderful Charles’bridge – everything in Prague is great. I really liked the city and in my view it is much more beautiful than Paris, or Amsterdam, or Berlin.

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Sinbad the sailor
Prague - first impressions 5 stars
1 of 1 people found this review helpful
Prague stays in your mind as one of the most beautiful cities in the world. The set of bridges across the Vltava River is remarkable – in particular the Charles IV Bridge, one of the ex-libris of the city.

Prague has clearly a Templar Knights influence as one can see across many areas of the old town – full of gothic elements. Going up into the magnificent castle will also present you with the notorious St. Vitus Cathedral.

The city invites walking along the margins of the river – and go across from one side to another. Has a mix of literature-art ambience with a quite interesting night life. Elements of the former “way-of-life” of Eastern Europe are still present and provide an extra picturesque touch


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Karrr
Overview 4 stars
I have a real fascination with Eastern Europe and love visitings the countries round there- we've done Latvia, Hungary and the Czech Republic recently. Interestingly, Riga was not that touristy but Budapest and Prague were and the Western influences were clear to see (Tesco and Marks and Spencer!). I would have liked to visit Prague a few years ago when it wasn't such a hen and stag weekend place and it was a bit cheaper, but that's not to say I didn't enjoy it. Prague is a very beautiful city, especially the old town- the Charles bridge is a stunning landmark that will melt the heart of even the most sceptical. Best to visit in the spring as winter can be very cold.

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annatravel
Money exchange in Prague 3 stars
As far as Prague has its own unique currency (but not EUR yet) every tourist needs to exchange some money. Of course one can just withdraw cash from ATMs, but often tourists use local banks and currency exchange points.
Last time we had some Euros with us that we needed to exchange. We were very happy to see numerous places offering this service with great rates. We have chosen one with the lowest rate stated on the board outside and entered. I gave them the bill and got back much less that expected. It occurred that the rate outside was valid only from 500 EUR amount. I told them that it was strange to not have it stated on the board and that it was really misleading, but the employee pointed the ridiculously tiny line at the bottom which was explaining the conditions. Later we found out that almost everywhere they use this trick!!! The attractive exchange rate is always the one for 100 EUR or more. Finally we have discovered that the best (and honest) rates are offered at small Arabic shops with yellow sign.


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