Sign In | Join now! It's free!Help |

Bangkok Travel Tips

4.0 stars

Insider advice for your Bangkok vacation


neilray
Bangkok BKK Open again...but 5 stars
I'm pleased to say, as most will now know, that the airports are now open, but don't get too excited just yet. I passed the Qatar Airlines office this morning and there were lots of travelers outside waiting for their turn for assistance. I then phoned an airline was supposed to be using to Kuwait and after half an hour of Greensleeves I was told I could get a seat on the 23rd. This may not be typical and I guess Thai International will have priority over fligthts in and out so their nationals can get home. There are quite a few stranded Thais around the world, as well as foreigners here. A friend is on his way back from Hong Kong tonight and is flying into Suvunarnabhumi, but departures are going to take a while to get going. I hope this information has been helpful and I can get back to the usual topics - food, hotels and travel!!

More

neilray
Airport Update 5 stars
Yiwen has added some extra information on the services from U Tapao, and today, Monday 1st there have been further services offered by Bangkok Airways to Samui, Saim Rep, Phuket, Luang Prabang( Laos) and Maldives. However on the downside the 'protestors' are moving the people camped out at Government House to both Suvunarnabhumi and Don Muang, thus increasing their numbers at the airports. Not a good sign for those trying to get fligthts in or out of Bangkok.

More

neilray
Pretty Cabs in Bangkok 4 stars
1 of 1 people found this review helpful
A question which few ask but I think is quite important when it comes to choosing a taxi in Bangkok is the difference between the various coloured cabs. Lined up at the traffic lights it sometimes resembles a fruit salad as the orange one, next to the lime green, one sits behind the puce one. In between theres the green and yellow one. Well, there is difference and not everyone knows this. The green and yellow ones are owned by the driver, whilst the pretty coloured ones are company owned and the driver is paid a salary. This is signifcant because the owner driver is less likely to spend lots of money on repairs and keeping his cab in good condition. I had a friend who used to look at a cab and if she didn't like the look of the cars condition, she would wait until a decent one came along.That was usually one of the pretty ones - maybe she just liked the colour. But there could be safety issues, so choose your taxi carefully - it could be important.

More

neilray
Hail a Cab! 4 stars
One of the most useful services the hotel bell hop or conceirge can do for a guest in Bangkok is get a taxi. for you. In Malaysia they have a beacon outside the hotel which flashes if a cab is needed at the hotel, which I have always thought a good idea. In Bangkok, the bell boy will go out on to the street or main road and get one brought to the hotel entrance for you. At my apartment, the security man will get on his bike and cycle down to the main road to get a cab for me. Its a great service and for the 20 Baht tip is well worth the convenience. At most hotels, the concierge will also take down the number of the cab and give you a ticket with the number on. I have never been sure what the purpose of this is, but it sends a message to the driver - "Put the meter on and no tricks, we've got your number!!"

More

neilray
Fairs Fare Taxis 4 stars
1 of 1 people found this review helpful
Bangkok has one of the highest taxi populations in the world, and they spend most of the day clogging up the city streets. But there are few alternatives for certain routes and late at night the Skytrain and MRT are finished. The visitor should be aware of charges, but first off, never use a taxi when the driver refuses to put the meter on. I have little trouble on this but I believe female passengers or people who look a bit vulnerable can have a problem - and that includes locals. The basic fare is 35 baht and then it goes up in 3 Baht increments. A typical 30 minute daytime journey would cost around 100 baht. From the centre of town to the airport would be around 250. Not 600 as some drivers tell you.!! Tolls are always paid by the passenger, so have some 20 Baht notes handy. This is also useful when paying the fare since drivers often find themsleves short of change when it comes to handing back the 40 Baht they owe you!

More

neilray
How would you like your fish? 4 stars
I have been here a while now but only discovered this service recently. It could be useful for those renting an apartment and self catering. The fish on the vendor stalls in the city always looks a bit overdone to me, and often I don't want that type of fish anyway. Lotus (Tesco) will cook a fish for you after you have selected it from thier iced counter. This means you can have the fish you want and have it cooked whilst you go round the rest of the store. If you want it grilled, then ask for it to be barbequed. It takes about 45 minutes as the fish have to wait in line for their turn.They don't charge for this service so a nice Indian Halibut will cost me about 30 baht and come freshly grilled as well. No bad at all!

More

neilray
New Routes on Nok 4 stars
I am beginning to sound like an agent for Nok Air, but they are doing some very good things, Whilst airlines are cutting routes, Nok have just announced flights to places which are handy for both tourists and for locals. These are places where a lot of the Bangkok working force comes from: Burriram, Nakhon Si Thammarat, Sakhon Nakhon and the like. The entire female bar population of Bangkok seems to come from Burriram, near Surin. So Nok are trying to tap into that market. But for visitors, Burriram is useful to get to see the Khmer riuins of the area, Nakhon Si Thammarat is very handy for the ferry to Samui, and Sakhon Nakhon gets you into the heart of Isan and near to Nong Khai for a trip to Laos.

More

neilray
The Khon Thai Dance 5 stars
For those who saw the most incredible ceremony for the funeral of The Kings sister, and the evening dance performance, some may be wondering what the dance was all about. This is the traditional Khon folk dance of Thailand, which is performed at special ceremonies. It is always in Thai, and is quite complicated. It also lasts a long time, something like 4 hours.So, what the tourist sees in the hotels is a packaged version of the dance as taught at the Bangkok School of Dance & Drama. i have been fortunate to have spent a day at this school and I can say, the students work extremely hard to perform this, one of the most traditional aspects of Thai culture

More

neilray
Any news today? 4 stars
Thailand is quite frustraing when it comes to the English written media. Magazine stalls boast thousands of titles with the headlines in English and then when I come to look inside its all in Thai. Even the international mags such as GQ and Vogue are all Thai, but thats fair enough - I'm the foreigner. There are two English edition newspapers, The Bangkok Post and The Nation. They are very different in their political outlook, with The Nation being more likely to make any critical remarks. The Post was staffed by a good number of western journos but those numbers are decreasing. Sports are covered quite extensively but obviously the time difference means most results are known from Europe and the USA well before the paper goes to print. The Post and The Nation tend to be sold around the tourist spots, but not in Thai communities, and not in great numbers either.

More

neilray
Toilets Thailand 1 stars
I may be the first to address this subject, but here goes! Thailand uses both Asian 'squat' toilets and the western style, but the further away from Bangkok the more liley it will be a Thai version. In public toilets such as those found in roadside gas stations or shops, there's often no paper inside the cubilce and here we get to the most practical of matters. Its often outside on a roll by the sinks but sometimes there is non at all - very inconvenient you might say. So, its well worth having a sheet or two in a bag or in your pocket, especially if going on one of the long bus journeys to the less sophisticated parts of the country. In bars in Bangkok you will be lucky to find any paper at all anywhere, so be warned. Used paper is put in the bin alongside, not flushed down the toilet. Plumbing problems often cause blockages, but I also think its just the way it is in Thailand. I hope this information is useful!!! Someone had to give this tip!

More

neilray
Open till Dawn 5 stars
Anyone who knows Thailand will be aware of the fact that it is a country of ambiguity . Many of the anomalies revolve around the minor laws of the country and. the only ones really held dear are those relating to the Royal Family. I had a call a few weeks ago from a hungover American who I was supposed to meet that day. He wanted to cancel because he felt ill due to drinking until 8 in the morning. I don't know anywhere in the world where clubs, and bars close at 1am, but then the drinkers from inside can go and drink in a 'bar' outside until - well as long as you want really. These bars are set up from about 11pm and are all along the busiest parts of Sukhumvit. They have a line up of spirits, a few tables, some plastic chairs and staffed by nice looking Thai ladies, The drinks are served all night and into the early morning hours. So, you cannot legally drink inside, but out on the street? No problem. More of the madness that is Thailand.

More

neilray
Anything You Want - Its Here 4 stars
There is a stretch of Sukhumvit Road which is almost exclusivley 'tourist' Between the two Skytrain stations of Asoke nd Nana the pavements on both sides of the road are jam packed with stalls selling 'stuff' .On any given day, its also jam packed from 8 in the evening to midnight with people who are buying the 'stuff' . Its a complete mess, with throngs of buyers from all over the globe stopping in the precious space there is to view DVD;s, bimoculars, knives,clothes,luggage,watches. You name it, its here. Many vendors are mute and unable to speak, so they communicate by sign language and most importantly, a calculator. Be patient. Trying to get along this section of the road is slow and can be very frustrating if not looking for new Rolex or Burbbery handbag. There's food stalls as well, just to add to the confusion. I don't think there's anywhere quite like it!!

More

neilray
Be insured! 4 stars
This is not my favourite topic but in these harder economical times, travelers might be tempted to leave home without an insurance. Going directly to a big insurance company is ususally cheapest and you know what you are getting. Healthcare in Thailand is excellent but it is a private system. Any foreigner needing treatment for a road accident or any other major health issue (snake bites, food poisening etc) would be taken to one of the international hospitals straight away, but if there's no insurance or the credit card declines, they will not treat a patient -plain and simple. A casualty would be transferred to a government hospital (not recomended). In one case last year a foreign resident was involved in a motorcycle accident and he had no insrance. They put him in a Baht bus ( a pick up with seats) and sent him on his way, but he died on route from his injuries. A sobering thought,, so make sure the cover is there.

More

neilray
Pick up the onward flight 4 stars
Bangkok is a great place to have as a base and I used to do that when in Asia, but living in the UK. One reason being the ease of geting around the region economically using the onward flights from Europe. Hong Kong is the easiest with Gulf, Emirates, Finnair, Ethiopian and Kenyan all offering very good prices for the last leg of their journey. Usually for around 8,000 Baht I can get a return ticket to Hong Kong on a 'proper' airline', not a 'no frills' job (which go to Macau, not Hong Kong by the way). For Singapore, then Swiss stop in Bangkok en route and for Taipei, KLM come here first, as do Eva. British Airways and Qantas stop in Bangkok on their way to Sydney, but I don't think that is a particulalry cheap option. Travel agents in Bangkok may try to steer you in the direction of Thai International or one of the national regional airlines, but just ask about some of these airlines or go online.

More

neilray
Time to Bring the Washing In 5 stars
Across the whole of Thailand, at various times of the year there are downpours. Its part of life in all the regions with some places harder hit than others. Carrying an umberella between July and November is a sensible thing to do, although its amazing how many don't, including myself. But there's one sure way of knowing what;s on the way and it isn't the darkening clouds. Its the wind. Quite suddenly, from nowwhere the flags will start to wave about, trees bend and everyone knows theres some heavy rain in store. its a monsoon wind which preludes a monsoon rain. In one bar I know in Soi 20, Sukhumvit, appropriately called The Rainhut, the girls will start to put up the temporary roof around the bar some 30 minutes before the rain arrives, just by judging the strength of the sudden wind. Thats when its time to bring the washing in, or maybe head for the dry shopping mall for a coffee.

More

neilray
Leave The Shoes at Home 5 stars
There are some etiquette details which new visitors to Thailand should know about. Some are not really applied but still appear in the guide books, but some are kept to and these refer to Buddhist temples and The Grand Palace. For the Palace, please dress modestly and that includes men not wearing shorts. No matter how long those shorts are, a visitor will be refused entry. Shoes can be a bit of a nuisance. I have made the mistake of wearing laced shoes, and having to undo them at every temple,so flip flops or sandals are ideal. On a temple visit it is a requirement to take shoes off at the entrance to each temple and there are shoe racks to pop shoes onto. Inside the temple, always sit with the soles of the feet pointing away from any Buddha image. Just have a look at how the Thai people sit and copy them. The idea is to tuck your feet under your legs and have then pointing sideways.

More

neilray
Watch your back! 5 stars
Bangkok has always had a fair number of beggars who sit in the street and it seems this is on the increase. But a more recent deveopment is a group of children who are more pro active. They play around in a group near the Asoke station and look as though they are just having fun. They have bunches of balloons and toys and get very close to tourists as though they are part of the game. If this happens move away quickly. They are slick and a friend from China lost 8,000 Baht from his back pocket when here. following this manouvre The money will go to a group who will operate these kids, and they will probably not be Thai, but Cambodian. So, beware fun loving kids in the street. Sad to report, I know but expensive if you get rolled over.

More

neilray
His Royal Highness 5 stars
One major piece of advice for new visitors to Thailand is to be very careful about the whole subject of The Royal Family. Thai people hold The King in total reverence and do not like to hear anyone criticising or making comments about their monarch. I cannot stress this enough and I have been in a situation where I have had to take a new visitor aside and basically tell him to keep quiet. He had upset a young student by criticising the actions of one of the Princesses. The best policy is to just accept that in Thailand The King is beyond critics and its interesting that many do not say "Our King" they say "My King" - it is personal.

More

neilray
You Play it Jumbo and I'll Sing it 4 stars
There may be many who read this and will be non too happy about the poor elephant who is central to this tip. I know its a shame that these wonderful creatures are used for tourist amusement, but this happens to be in a very Thai part of Bangkok, not in the touristy Sukhumvit or Silom districts. Last week I was having a beer, whilst watching a football game at a bar called Cheers, on Pathon Yothin, near Lad Phrao. I cannot give any better info than that. It takes a lot to distract me from a footy match but there was a youngish elephant being taken for a walk down the road and theres nothing new or special in that. But this one was playing a harmonica. Now in Bangkok I see some crazy things, and most make me smile. This was no exception. There was young Jumbo, flashing light on his tail, with a harmonica strapped to the mouth of his trunk. As he walked, so he played. His handlers were selling food for him at the usual 20 Baht a bag. This place is just bonkers!!

More

neilray
How to Pay on a Bangkok Bus 5 stars
This is easy!! The only difficulty is saying where to go and knowing which bus to take.. I get the local bus to the MRT every day and back again, and its the lowest fare, so theres no problem. I can also rely on help from my fellow passengers - Thais who seem to think its a bit of a hoot to see a 'farang' (foreigner) on a bus. But here's how it goes: There is no automated,"pay the driver" system It is a simple pay the conductor or conductress, who gives out a ticket. So I can say Central Lad Phrao, or BTS (Skytrain) or my Soi number, which is Soi Ye Sip Sam (23) and she (usually a she) gives me a rather basic paper ticket. for 10 Baht (Sip) or 14 (Sip See) if it is one of the air con buses. The tickets look like the kind of thing children played with 40 years ago. Our conductress will most likely smile, make a joke in Thai to all the other passengers and everyone has a laugh at my expense - I love it!!

More


Page: 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 7 ... 13


About us | Terms and Conditions | Imprint

Copyright © 2006-2017 Paperball GmbH and their respective owners - All Rights Reserved.