Sign In | Join now! It's free!Help |

Peru Travel Tips

3.0 stars

Insider advice for your Peru vacation


Sinbad the sailor
Peru's airport taxes - remember this!! 4 stars
I just returned recently from a wonderful trip to Peru. I was in Lima and Iquitos mainly – and the visit to the Amazon jungle was the voyage of my life, in parallel with Antarctica. Highly recommend a visit.
I found the Peruvians in general very nice and welcoming people. There is a boring detail though about traveling in Peru – airport taxes. In domestic or international flights you need to pay an airport tax just a few moments before you fly - the last step before you go to your boarding gate.
Of course this is an unnecessary waste of time, since such taxes could be included in the air tickets. You can only pay in cash – and better be sure to have the equivalent to 4.63 (leaving from Iquitos) or 5.84 US Dollars (from Lima) for each domestic flight and 31 USD for foreign departures. You can also pay in Peruvian Nuevos Soles – but be sure to have the cash at departure time or you will not fly without paying the taxes.


More

LucyHB
Over-enthusiastic taxi drivers! 1 stars
Coming from a country where finding a taxi in the evening is a mammoth task that can involve hours of queuing in the cold (ie England), I never thought I'd find myself complaining about there being too many taxis. In Peru, however, I did frequently find myself complaining about the constant (and I mean, literally, constant) beeping of taxis and call of 'TAXI!!!!'. At bus stations the taxi drivers would follow us around, hissing 'taxi' in our ears without stop, despite us telling them firmly we didn't need one. Walking down the street, every single taxi (and every other car is a taxi here) would beep, yell and sometimes try and bundle us into the cab - even if we were just walking two minutes to the shop. I very much appreciate that these people need to earn a living and that competition is beyond fierce, but the relentless taxi-hassle nontheless does begin to grate after a while. Next time, I think I might fashion myself a banner declaring 'I don't need a taxi' in Spanish, and hold it above my head whenever I leave the house!

More

LucyHB
Combi vans 3 stars
You might not want to take a combi van in Peru if you're in a hurry. These little vans might be ubiquitous and cheap, but be warned that, just because you're aboard it doesn't mean the van is going to set off in any kind of hurry. Rather than sticking to any kind of timetable, the buses' drivers like to make sure the vehicle is full before it sets off, making sure the money-making potential is maximised. Especially in small towns, you can find yourself being driven up and down the same roads for an hour or more, as the driver hollers loudly for more customers. The combis are a cheap, entertaining way to travel around, but if you've got to be somewhere in a hurry then you might be better off taking a taxi!!

More

LucyHB
Avoiding unwanted attention 2 stars
Ladies, if you're coming to Peru then prepare to be subject to the amorous intentions of many, many Peruvians. Females, especially those who 'look' very foregin (eg blonde girls) can expect to be whistled at, shouted at, grabbed at....it can be intimidating, but mostly it's harmless. To avoid attention as best you can, dress modestly - it might sound drab but clothes that cover legs, chest etc are a better bet than mini skirts and vests! I found the problem to be particularly bad in Lima, so try to keep covered up there.

More

LucyHB
Egg-cellent 4 stars
1 of 1 people found this review helpful
Perhaps surprisingly, Peru turned out to be one of the best countries in South America for vegetarian meals and snacks. On the street, little bags of quail's eggs were the order of the day - served salted and with very optional hot chilli sauce. These cost next to nothing, and I found them all over the country but particularly on the coast. There are some great, incredibly cheap veggie restaurants here too, in the unlikeliest places. Trujillo, for example, had not one but three veggie restaurants serving super-cheap lunchtime 'plates of the day' - for just a few soles you'll get a juice, starter, main course and even a pudding if you're lucky. The menus change every day, which stops things getting boring and means you never know what to expect!

More

jempickle
South/Central America 1 stars
1 of 1 people found this review helpful
I'm just starting to think about my next trip. I went all over Asia last time and loved it. Next I'm hoping to spend a month or two, depending on how much time I can blag off, in South/Central America. Won't be for a while unfortunately...

Does anyone have any advice on a sensible route for that amount of time. In Asia we managed to do loads but we had to move so quickly to do so!


More

soulchaser
The end of the line - almost 1 stars
Despite everything I went to sleep happy that night. I had my sleeping bag, the kids weren't crying, the Peruvians were sleeping, and it was the last night of this, my own personal hell! I should have suspected the pattern though, as the next day was to destroy my mood and any chance of enjoying the last 12 hours of the trip. I had run out of water and was developing a serious headache and every gas station and truck stop we passed was like a hammer to my head, it also seemed like every passenger on the coach had been exchanged for a screaming kid and they were on a screaming relay to make sure the noise was incessant, the driver had given in to the whistles of the Peruvian family and was playing Latin American trash on the stereo at a terrific volume which made the speakers rattle and hiss, the Peruvians were so delighted that they were dancing in the isle next to my seat clapping and yelling and screaming "Por favor!" every 30 seconds at a pitch that was nearly out of range for my ears and made my physically wince every time I heard it, and my attempts to drown the noise out with loud rock from my cd player only added to the racket. I was driven to utter desperation and would have admitted to every political assassination in recorded history if promised escape from this. By midday I wanted to get out and walk the 500 miles left to Lima but the driver refused to stop, "You've got your bloody sleeping bag, what more do you want?" he seemed to be saying when I approached him.

More

LucyHB
Back on the beach at Mancora 4 stars
1 of 1 people found this review helpful
By now, we were fearing that our Rio tans were fading fast, and wanted to get some quick sun-tanning action in before we reached the Caribbean Coast. Handily, just by the border with Ecuador sits Mancora, a small beach town known for having the best beaches in Peru. In order to get here we had to travel to the border town of Tumbes and then double back on ourselves by combi van, but it was worth it to get back on the warm sands.

There are plenty of places to stay, but we had to do quite a bit of wandering around to find something affordable - and it was less than salubrious, but close to the beach. We spent two days here, relaxing, drinking on the beach and eating in the great veggie cafe opposite the beach. After we left we felt we should have stayed longer, so you might want to plan for a few days R&R here.


More



About us | Terms and Conditions | Imprint

Copyright © 2006-2013 Cosmotourist GmbH & Co. KG and their respective owners - All Rights Reserved.