Sign In | Join now! It's free!Help |

Singapore City Travel Tips

4.0 stars

Insider advice for your Singapore City vacation


guest
Wine Connection Tapas Bar & Bistro @ Robertson Walk 5 stars
Best place in Singapore if you're looking for affordable wine and dinners!

More

adventurer
Popular local cuisine – Steamboat/hot pot 5 stars
With a boiling pot of tasty soup (you can choose from all sorts of flavours from ginger chicken to hot spicy soup) and raw seafood or meat, Steamboat, or commonly known as Hot pot, is extremely popular among the locals, and all over Asia.

Originated in China, Steamboat is not only eaten during cold days, but also in the tropical heat of sunny Singapore. Most steamboat restaurants are equipped with airconditioning, making dining a comfortable and fun experience.

Steamboat restaurants usually offer a wide array of raw seafood and meat, allowing you to dip them into the soup yourself to cook them within minutes. It is an enjoyable experience shared with families and friends over a traditionally Chinese round table. There are lots of steamboat restaurants in Singapore to choose from – many concentrated along Tan Qwee Lan Street, in the Bugis area, the heart of Singapore.


More

JamesH
Market shopping 4 stars
Bugis is a good place to shop for certain types of clothes, for cheap food and general market stuff like belts, bags, watches, sunglasses... Its an indoor market connected to a shopping centre with the usual clothes shops - Topman and stuff. There's a big and cheap food hall in the shopping centre with loads of exciting food and a stall doing all sorts of juices like guava, melon, pineapple, strawberry. This place gets busy at night and is located near the MRT station - Bugis. Well worth a visit for the lively street market feel.


More

JamesH
Buying fun stuff 4 stars
The China Town centre is great for buying cool things. I went there in 2005 and bought this amazing little glass bottle with a painting done on the inside for like 10 pounds, then I went back in summer 2008 looking for another and they were all around a hundred pounds, tres bizarre. There are lots of little 'semi-touristy' things like this to be found, like fake scroll paintings and replica ornaments. I quite like these little faked bits of culture for some reason. Singapore is quite strange like that, as an outsider I found it to have assimilated lots of other cultures and turned them into shopping malls and restaurants... I'm not being negative, I liked it, but maybe it all felt a little empty sometimes.

More

neilray
Getting Your Money back 4 stars
Singapore has a tax on goods called GST, which is levied on all items purchased in the country.. For tourists it is probably easier to get a refund in SIngapore than any other location., It also has one of the more flexible mehtods of retreiving this tax than other countries. The levels are a very modest SGD 100, or the equivalent of around €52. There is a time limit of 2 months since the date of purchase, but if the criteria is met, then a GST Claim Form is filled out at Changi Airport, and all the various red tape is completed. The refund is collected at the Refund Counter, but remember to claim the refund before checking in baggage, otherwise there may be a problem with take on cabin bags.

More

neilray
Riding the Parkway 4 stars
Singapore city centre is not a great place for the outdoor enthusiast, and many Singaporeans head off to Sentosa island at the weekends just to get away from the office blocks. However, for cyclists, joggers or rollerbladers, the best place to practice or enjoy a quiet ride is down the East Coast Parkway. I have spent many hours walking along the sea side park, where it is safely tucked away from motor traffic, with tree lined shores. It is not a perfect beach area and the view out to sea is dotted with cargo ships entering port, but as a cycle or walking area it is as good as it gets in Singapore

More

neilray
River Cruising 4 stars
A strong feature of Singapore is the modern skyline, the commercial buildings and the city as a financial centre of Asia. Learnig the story of how all this came to be is included in one the fascinating tours that can be taken on the river cruises. They leave from Robinsons Quay, which is the place where the founder Sir Stamford Raffles landed in the 1819. The tours take the river trip past the old customs house and on to the central part of the city. The boats are known as 'bumboats' and amogst other things to do in Singapore, this is one not to miss

More

_Gleam_
Shop like the locals do! 3 stars
If you’re feeling adventurous or have a lot of time to kill, get on the MRT and stop at a station with a mall nearby for a unique and authentic Singaporean experience. You’ll get to observe a different aspect of the people (where they are not as dressed up as they would be in town). You may stumble upon some good and cheap buys but they’re usually available in town areas too. If you’re not Asian (-looking), you may get stares but they’re probably just curious to know what brings you to their humble heartland.

More

neilray
Bird song at the traffic Lights 3 stars
As most visitors to Singapore well know, the laws in the city include the offence of jaywalking. Anyone making a dash across the road against the lights takes the risk of a fine. But at pedestrian crossing with lights control it may not all that obvious that it is time to cross. Instead of the normal beeping noise, Singapore has some places where they have birdsong as the audio sign to cross the road. This is fine if the location is not near a tree. It would be easy to assume that the bird singing is poised somewhere above, not signaling the time to cross the road

More

neilray
Perfection on the Rails 5 stars
I always think Singapore has tried to achieve some sort of Utopia when it comes to public transport, and it gets better by the year. At one time the taxi or bus was the only way into town from the airport, but that is no longer the case. The green line runs straight into the airport. Marina Square was slightly off the main routes but now the red line runs through to Marina. Gradually Singapore has covered all the bases when it comes to moving people from one place to another. Its no wonder I and many other visitors admire the island state so much – but then again it is small and comes in a neat island package!

More

neilray
Driving in the rain, I'm driving in the rain 3 stars
Not quite the song we know but driving in the rain anywhere on the Malay Peninsula is a bit dodgy, not to say dangerous. I have been in some torrential downpours in South East Asia with Singapore being the most frequent. In Malaysia and Thailand the rainy season is quite defined as May to October, but in SIngapore there can be heavy rains at any time. The good news is that an incoming storm is easy to spot out to sea, and there is time to get indoors. If out on the roads and it does start, then there are signs showing an umbrella at bridges, indicating this is a place to stop and keep dry. Motor cyclists will congragate under a bridge until the rain finishes and then continue with their journey. Its best to the follow the locals and also stop. I once waited 30 minutes under a bridge and made some new friends whilst there!

More

neilray
Tree Tops in the city 5 stars
We don't usually associate Singapore with much greenery but I have found that Singapore has suddenly become keen on green. The government are creating 'green corridors ' between the high rises, shops and offices. There will be cycle tracks and short cuts for walkers, but one of the best innovations is the Tree Top Walk, built about 4 years ago. This is out at MacRitchie Reservoir which has always been one of the few remaining green areas on the island. The bright idea of building a high level walkway with a suspension bridge across the rainforest canopy was undoubtedly a good one. Life at the top of the trees is something anyone like me finds fascinationg so I was thrilled to try it out. The route is one way, so we don't have bottle necks on the bridge and being Singapore its carefully monitored and controled. Its a great day out with an opportunity to see life at the top outside the boardroom.

More

neilray
Are you in the possession of chewing gum? 3 stars
The island state is well known for all the things I am not allowed to do. Singapore has the most stringent public laws of any country in the world. In public places or on transport I am not allowed to smoke, drink, eat, spit, or .........eat chewing gum. Singaporeans will say all these rules make it a better place to live and work, and I agree. I hate spitting as done in China, I don't smoke, and not eating on trains, especially smelly burgers is fair enough. But chewing gum? Where did that come from? Apparently one of the city officials had some stuck to the seat of his pants on a public bench so they had it banned! The question is: How does a nation control the use of chewing gum?

More

febynurdiana
Lucky Plaza at Orchard Street 4 stars
People normally go to Orchard Street for branded shopping—Orchard Street has the biggest shopping malls in Singapore with lots of designers’ boutique. However, there’s one particular building that goes out of the way a bit—Lucky Plaza.

This shopping centre is quite popular for its cheap prices—anything from jewelry, watches, perfumes, even electronic gadgets; you can find it here on a bargain. Lucky Plaza is also known for its Asian food court on the basement level. The food court mainly has Chinese, Indonesian and some Indian dishes, with prices ranging from S$3 – S$5 per main dish.

I personally like going to Lucky Plaza when I’m shopping for gifts to bring back home. On the basement level, there are some shops that sell pretty scarves, Pashminas and shawls, only for S$10 for 4 pieces. I’m a fan of Pashminas, so you can bet that I’ve got my collection from these shops. Some shops also sell fancy watches and artificial stone necklaces, with prices as low as S$10 for 3. If people wonder why I change my watch once every 2 weeks; it’s because I shop here.


More

febynurdiana
Bugis Street -- A Cheap and Cheerful Shopping Spree 4 stars
Singapore has always been associated with shopping and fashion, but nowadays the shopping gets entirely glamorous. Big shopping malls are scattered throughout Singapore, but they mostly sell designers’ or branded items, or at least, high-street labels.

To shop as cheap as chips, I would normally go to Bugis Street—where hundreds of shops sell everything from the trendiest wrap skirt to the classiest leather boots. If you’re looking for presents for your loved ones back home, they have anything that you can imagine: magnets, key chains, T-Shirts, watches, all in bargain.

It’s also convenient to visit, just take the MRT to Bugis Station and alight there. The market should be just outside the MRT Station.


More

febynurdiana
Pagoda Street -- The Shopping Heaven of Chinatown 5 stars
If you’re looking for Chinese ornaments to decorate your home, or unique presents for your loved ones back home, here’s the place to buy it.

Pagoda Street is located at the heart of Singapore’s Chinatown, and has been known for its street market. Anything from pillow cases to feng shui mirrors, bead necklaces to jade bracelets, they have it here.

Actually, I often go here to shop for accessories. I’m an accessory freak and there are shops here that sell lovely necklaces, at S$10 for 3 (or S$4 each). They also have embroidered bags with Chinese motives, calligraphy, etc.

In case you need a break after shopping, there are also some food stalls and a hawker center. The stalls sell a remarkable selection of Chinese and other traditional snacks.

To go here, take the MRT to Chinatown Station and alight there. Pagoda Street is just outside one of the exit (Check out which one on the information board at the station).


More

JamesH
Singapore's Night Market 5 stars
1 of 1 people found this review helpful
I had a transfer in Singapore on my way back from the Philippines and had an evening to do something so went to the night market. It turned out to be really enjoyable though I'm not sure I would have wanted to stay long in Singapore. I took the train from the airport to central Singapore and walked to the market which extends over several streets. It was busy but fun, with a procession of people dressed as animals and hitting drums coming past at one point. They sell all kinds of stuff from tourist stuff to more authentic objects. There was loads of jewlery. I bought a small glass bottle which had a painting on the inside. It is really beautiful and I still have it now. There are lots f restaurants selling delicious food at cheap prices around the market area. When i got bored of the market I walked to the river which reflected rows of busy restaurants sitting on either side of it.

More

febynurdiana
The Imperial Cheng Ho Harbor Cruise 5 stars
I personally think this cruise is a tour every tourist should do in Singapore. There are four choices of cruise, the Morning Glory in the morning, High Tea and Dragon Cruise in the afternoon and Imperial Dinner in the evening. All is done on board the replica of the authentic Admiral Cheng Ho’s (a renowned Chinese admiral who first sailed the Indian Ocean) vessel, which is highly decorated with Chinese ornaments and carvings.

I didn’t have the chance to go on the evening one, which I regretted a bit because I’d thought the evening one would be more stunning with night lights, stars and all, but the afternoon one turned out to be amazing too.

The cruise starts at the Marina Square, one of the local cruise centers. Conveniently, the tour company provides shuttle buses from several points throughout Singapore, so we were picked up from Fairmont Hotel which is in the city center. We sailed around Singapore’s surrounding sea for 2 ½ hours, and tourists will get to see the neighboring islands on Singapore’s water, as well as beaches and coves. Afternoon cruises stop for 30 minutes at Kusu Island, one of Singapore’s satellite islands, but I think it wasn’t that impressive.

We chose the High Tea Cruise which started at 3 PM and cost S$32 per person, pastries and refreshments buffet included. The High Tea and Dragon Cruise will board together on the same craft, but for different cruises they will give you different stickers to put on your shirt. The Dragon Cruise is only a few dollars cheaper, but you’ll only get biscuits on board, while the High Tea guests get the buffet. I strongly suggest you choose the High Tea instead, as the pastries are just marvelous. They have Chicken Curry Puff, Tuna Puff, Cream Puff, Strawberry Roll Cake, Egg Tarts, Éclairs and other cakes, and it really worth the extra couple of dollars.

You have to book in advance for this tour, so check out their website at www.watertours.com.sg for more information.


More

febynurdiana
Planning Your Trips with Buses 5 stars
1 of 1 people found this review helpful
As I have mentioned before, and perhaps many other visitors have experienced, Singapore has one of the best public transportation systems in the world. Especially the MRT (Mass Rapid Transit) Train, which takes you conveniently to most places in Singapore’s mainland, safely and cheaply.

Unfortunately, not all MRT lines take you directly to other places—say, for example, to Haw Par Villa, the Botanical Gardens, or even the Singapore Zoo. And that’s only to name a few. Sometimes, the only way you can get directly to certain places is by taking a bus. Singapore has plenty of buses going on various routes (which are described by their numbers) and there are bus stops at every turn.

I find these buses very helpful. At the bus stops there’s always an information board that tells you which buses pass the stop, what route they will take, how frequent they pass, and how much passengers should pay for a certain destination. If you are not using the EZ-Link card to pay the fare, it’s always necessary to check the fare on these information boards before you get on the bus, as you have to prepare and pay the correct change.

Some bus stops are also equipped with a digital board that tells you how long before a certain bus number will arrive. It always saves me from the pain of waiting.

However, the most important thing for you to do before taking a bus is obviously to know what bus number you have to take, and also where exactly you have to board and alight to get to a certain destination.

I always use the Journey Planner page on www.sbstransit.com.sg website before I travel by bus. This is one of the bus operators’ official website, which helps a lot when we’re visiting new places. All you have to do is type in the street, landmark or building name of both the place where you start and need to go to. The website will then calculate suggestions about which buses to take and the nearest bus stop to board. They even sort out the alternatives by the shortest traveling time, the cheapest fare, and the shortest walking distance for you. I really love this planner, and I’m sure visitors will find it helpful too.


More

febynurdiana
Singapore EZ-Link Cards 5 stars
If you’re traveling by public transport in Singapore, I really recommend you to buy the EZ-Link Card.

Singapore’s public transport system is one of the best in the world—I always hear this from foreigners. They have the MRT (Mass Rapid Transit) train, which is a semi-subway train (it comes out above ground outside the city centre), and it reaches all parts of Singapore’s mainland.

Singapore also has excellent bus services, served by two different companies, and the routes and bus numbers are conveniently displayed at every stop. The EZ-Link Card is a magnetic tap-in-tap-out value card which can be used for the MRT and buses services, and also at some vending machines and even McDonald’s.

Although passengers can pay by cash on these facilities, I highly recommend you to buy the card. Firstly, it cuts the queuing time you need to buy tickets at MRT stations, which can be quite busy at peak hours. Moreover, you need to pay S$1 deposit for MRT tickets and refund it again at the end of your journey, and this can be impractical. Secondly, it saves you from the hurdles of looking for coins for bus fares and MRT self-automated ticket machines, as you need to pay with the correct change. And thirdly, the fares are about 20 cents cheaper per trip for passengers using the EZ-Link cards.

You can also buy a Singapore Tourist Pass card, which is a modified EZ-Link card, but to my knowledge it has S$8 per day rate and might be uneconomical if you’re traveling short distances. Besides, the Tourist Card doesn’t serve express buses which I find quite handy at times.

I usually buy EZ-Link card for visiting guests (I’ve used the card since I first moved to Singapore), and I think it has the best value. It’s priced at S$15 per card, which consists of S$5 card price, S$3 deposit, and S$7 fare value. You can redeem the S$3 and the left-over value on your card when you leave Singapore. Cards are available at Passenger Service Center in MRT Stations. Oh, and don’t forget, one card can only be used by one passenger, so each of you have to buy one.


More


Page: [1] 2


About us | Terms and Conditions | Imprint

Copyright © 2006-2017 Paperball GmbH and their respective owners - All Rights Reserved.